Discussion brings awareness to domestic violence

Stephen Jennings, left, and Lynn Jennings, right, counselors at Jennings Counseling Associates, participated in a domestic violence discussion panel on the Downtown Campus.
Stephen Jennings, left, and Lynn Jennings, right, counselors at Jennings Counseling Associates, participated in a domestic violence discussion panel on the Downtown Campus.
Stephen Jennings, left, and Lynn Jennings, right, counselors at Jennings Counseling Associates, participated in a domestic violence discussion panel on the Downtown Campus.

The Legal Society of Amarillo College hosted a three-part live discussion panel in support of October’s cause: domestic violence awareness. The latest event, titled ‘Understanding the Dynamics,’ was conducted Oct. 14 on the Downtown Campus. The live panel featured four speakers who discussed aspects of domestic violence and “the dynamics from the offender point of view,” said Robin Malone, an AC assistant professor of legal studies.The efforts of the Legal Society originated from a collective desire from the club to provide the community with a venue that allowed open discussion about domestic violence issues. “Domestic violence touches on so many different ethnicities, cultures and socioeconomic backgrounds, we just felt like it was our obligation to educate people,” Malone said. The event drew about 30 participants that included local members of the Amarillo community, AC students and members of the Legal Society. Speakers at the live panel consisted of members from the local community actively engaged in efforts directed at identifying and providing assistance to those affected by domestic violence. Trudy Banner, a Highland Park Student and Family Advocacy services representative; Kathy Tortoreo, BIPP coordinator for Family Support Services; and Stephen and Lynn Jennings of Jennings Counseling Services and Associates were present to discuss the specialty training and programs offered by their respective organizations. During the discussion, Banner highlighted key areas of identification that included “helping kids understand that they’re in an unhealthy relationship” and ensuring that “parents know what to look for” when dealing with youth domestic violence issues. Tortoreo added to the discussion by attributing some underlying issues for domestic violence to being linked to a “specific belief system” that fosters “anger as a tool.” She said that is why the battery intervention program at Family Support Services is committed to cure the disease with BIPP. Stephen Jennings spoke on the efforts of the Jennings Counseling Services and how “a lot of people need accountability” and education on “how to have healthy relationships.” Overall, the messages from the panel were well received by the audience.“I saw a lot of people approach the panelists and get advice,” said Caleb Hidalgo, a business administration major. “Clearly their message was being taken to heart by a lot of members of the audience.” Another audience member said the discussion was highly informative and important. “It’s in the community, we know it’s there, but it’s a gray area because not everyone wants to talk about it,” said Olga Rodriguez, a legal studies major. Admission was free for the event, and participation was encouraged from the whole community to support bringing awareness to domestic violence issues even after this month is over.

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*


This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.